Hall of Fame

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Hall of Fame inductees.

2013
2012
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2010
2009
Class of 2009
~ Teams ~

1938 Sharpe Green Devils

Sharpe completed a 36-1 season by defeating Maysville 36-27 in the championship game. The Green Devils defeated Louisville St. Xavier, the eventual National Catholic Interscholastic Tournament champion, 28-26 in the semifinal.

Coached by Homer Holland, the Green Devils were led by James King and Deward “Red” Culp, both named to the All-State team. Other team members included Charlie Harper, Jewell Jessup, Albert Brooks, Charles Rudolph, Loy Liles, Clifton Thomasson, Murl Barrett, Reese Barrett, manager Walter Buck Bailey, and mascot Charles Holland.


1947 Brewers Redmen

1947 Brewers Redmen The dominant school in Region 1 during the 1940s, Brewers fell just short of the championship in 1947, losing in the championship to Maysville by a score of 54-40. During their six-year championship run (from 1943-48) under Coach McCoy Tarry, the Redmen won 173 games while losing only 19.

Team members were Barney Thweatt, Tom Mathis, Mason Cope, Buddy Rose, Charles Stone, Joe Smith, Leroy Smith, Coy Creason, Van Mathis, Jim Owens, Roy Darnell, Rudy Wright, and Kenneth Arnett.


1948 Brewers Redmen

The 1948 State Champions completed their season with a 36-0 record by defeating Maysville in a rematch of the 1947 championship game. The Redmen remain the last men’s team to enjoy an undefeated season. Brewers was rated the No. 1 team in the nation by the Chuck Taylor Rating Authority, as well as by the Associated Press.

Coached by McCoy Tarry, members of the team included Coy Creason, Barney Thweatt, Tom Mathis, Van Mathis, Jim Owens, Mason Cope, Roy Darnell, Paul Blagg, Charles Stone, Leroy Smith, George Horn, Joe Smith, and managers Kayo Mathis and Donnie Mathis.


1959 North Marshall Jets

The last boy’s state championship team from Marshall County, North Marshall logged a 36-1 record on its way to the 1959 championship, where the Jets defeated favorite Louisville Manual 64-63. North is also the last boy’s team from the first region to win the Sweet Sixteen. The Jets were coached by Charlie Lampley, who was assisted by Buddy Poe. Team members included Sammy Clark, Pat Doyle, Sonny Ellington, Benny Goheen, Jimmy Lampley, Dolph Larimer, Jerry Powell, Kendall King, Gary Seay, R. M. Spiceland, Mitchell Watkins, and Joel Wommack. Team managers were Jimmy Draffen, Eddie Mosier, Bill Barter, Harold Young, and Jimmy Watkins.


~ Players ~
James King

James King

James King Led the 1938 Sharpe Green Devils to the state title. Played at the University of Kentucky, and Coach Adolph Rupp stated that “James King was the most outstanding player he ever coached.” King was an All-SEC player in 1941 and 1942, and also made the All-SEC tournament team both years. He played center at Kentucky for three years. After his playing career ended, King entered the Army Air Corps in 1942 during World War II, and was killed in action in 1944.


Mason Cope

Mason Cope

Mason Cope Cope played on the 1947 and 1948 Brewers state tournament teams. At 5’ 11”, he jumped center and never lost the opening tip. In 1949, Cope made every All-State team, was the most valuable player in the North- South All-Star game, and was named the No. 1 High School Player in the Nation. He went on to play college basketball at Murray State and Kentucky Wesleyan, and was named Little All-American while at Kentucky Wesleyan. Cope is a member of John McGill’s Sweet Sixteen Hall of Fame and the Kentucky Wesleyan Hall of Fame. After graduation he was drafted by the St. Louis Hawks of the NBA.


Coy Creason

Coy Creason

Coy Creason Creason was a starting guard on the 1946, 1947, and 1948 Brewers state tournament teams. He was named to the 1947 and 1948 All-State tournament teams, the Courier-Journal All-State team, and was named Kentucky’s Player of the Year in 1948. Creason played four years at Memphis State, and is a member of Memphis State Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the John McGill Sweet Sixteen Hall of Fame. Creason also played in the Kentucky-Indiana All-Star game and the East-West All-Star game in 1948.


"Jumpin" Joe Fulks, Jr.

Known as “Jumpin’” Joe Fulks, he was known as the inventor of the jump shot. He played at Birmingham from 1937-39, and went on to play at Murray State University and in the National Basketball Association. He was named to the NBA Silver Anniversary Team and is a member of the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame and the Murray State Hall of Fame. Fulks was an NBA Most Valuable Player, and set an NBA singlegame scoring record by scoring 63 points against the Indianapolis Jets in 1949, a record which stood until Elgin Baylor broke it in 1959. Fulks was one of the first players enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame.


Joe Holland

Joe Holland

Holland led the 1943 Benton Indians to the state semifinals. He went on to play at the University of Kentucky from 1945-48. In 1947, Holland was named to the All-SEC first team, and also made the All-SEC tournament team that year. Holland was also a member of the first national championship team at Kentucky in 1948, and was an alternate on the 1948 US Olympic Basketball Team. He was drafted in the 1948 NBA draft by Baltimore.


Herb Hurley

Herb Hurley

Hurley was an outstanding player who graduated from Calvert City in 1939. He went on to play college basketball at Murray State University from 1942-44, and led the Racers in scoring during the 1943-44 season. Hurley was inducted into the Murray State University Hall of Fame in 1990. Hurley was remembered for his play against fellow Hall of Famer Joe Fulks in 1939, when playing before a standing room only crowd of about 600. He and Fulks dueled back and forth in an overtime game which saw Hurley’s Calvert City defeat Kuttawa. Hurley also played professionally.


Barney Thweatt

Barney Thweatt


Thweatt was a starting guard on the 1946, 1947, and 1948 Brewers state tournament teams, and was team captain in 1947 and 1948. He was named to the 1947 All-State tournament team, the Lexington Herald All-State team, and the Courier-Journal All-State second team. He played college basketball at Memphis State and Murray State. Thweatt is also a member of the John McGill Sweet Sixteen Hall of Fame, and the Kentucky Association of Basketball Coaches Court of Honor. He coached thirteen seasons, and his teams won six district and two regional titles. His 1963 Oldham County team advanced to the Sweet Sixteen final four. Tweatt also served as a school administrator in Marshall County for several years.


Bob Warren

Bob Warren

Warren had a distinguished career at South Marshall High School, where he graduated in 1964. He then went on to play collegiately at Vanderbilt University from 1964-68, where he was a member of the All-SEC team. Warren was drafted in the second round of the NBA draft by Atlanta, and in the second round of the ABA draft by the Los Angeles Stars. He went on to play seven seasons in the American Basketball Association with the Los Angeles Stars and the San Antonio Spurs.


Joe Dan Gold

Joe Dan Gold

Gold starred at Benton High School from 1955-59, leading Benton to a regional championship in 1958. He was named to the 1958 All-State tournament team. He played at Mississippi State and was All-SEC in 1963, playing on three SEC championship teams in 1961, 1962, and 1963. He was a member of the SEC All-Academic team in 1963, and was a second team Academic All-American in 1963. He was the head coach at Mississippi State from 1965-70, and also coached at Paducah Community College from 1971-73, at Mercer University during the 1973-74 season, and at Fleming County High from 1975-79. He is a member of the Mississippi State Athletic Hall of Fame.


Pat Doyle

Pat Doyle

Doyle graduated from North Marshall High in 1959, where he led the Jets to a 38-1 record and the 1959 state championship. He was the leading scorer with 608 points in 38 games. His free throw percentage was 69.6%. He was named to the All-District and All-Region teams, was Purchase Player of the Year, and a member of the 1959 All-State tournament team. He was also MVP of the 1959 Sweet Sixteen and was the leading scorer in the championship game, scoring 18 points against Louisville Manual. He was Kentucky’s Mr. Basketball in 1959. He then went on to play four years for Coach Adolph Rupp at the University of Kentucky, and was inducted into the Kentucky High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame in 2009.


~ Coaches ~
Charlie Lampley

Charlie Lampley

Lampley coached the 1959 North Marshall Jets in their 36-1 state championship season. Lampley won 436 games in his coaching career from 1955-76. He was also an All-Purchase team member in 1946 and 1947 and started at guard for the Murray State 1951 OVC Championship team. He was Purchase Coach of the Year in 1959 and 1960, and was named the Kentucky coach of the Year in 1959 by the Courier-Journal and by the Lexington Herald. His 1961 North Marshall team won the regional title, and he had runner-up finishes in 1957 and 1958. He was named Regional Coach of the Year in Illinois in 1967. Lampley returned to Marshall County in 1967, coached at South Marshall from 1967-74, and was the first coach at Marshall County High School. Lampley is also a member of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association Hall of Fame, and was named to the Kentucky Association of Basketball Coaches Court of Honor in 2008. He was also named to the top 25 athletes in the Jackson Purchase area for the 20th century by the Paducah Sun as both a player and a coach.


Homer Holland

Homer Holland

Holland led the 1943 Benton Indians to the state semifinals. He went on to play at the University of Kentucky from 1945-48. In 1947, Holland was named to the All-SEC first team, and also made the All-SEC tournament team that year. Holland was also a member of the first national championship team at Kentucky in 1948, and was an alternate on the 1948 US Olympic Basketball Team. He was drafted in the 1948 NBA draft by Baltimore.


McCoy Tarry

McCoy Tarry

Tarry coached at Brewers for ten years, and his teams compiled a record of 247-51. Four of his teams won regional championships, in 1944, 1946, 1947, and 1948. The 1944 team was undefeated until losing in the quarter finals of the state tournament, ending with a 33-1 record. The 1946 team lost in the first round at state, and the 1947 team made it to the final before losing to Maysville and had a 34-2 record. The 1948 team won the state title with a 36-0 record. Tarry was named Coach of the Year in 1948. He is a member of John McGill’s Sweet Sixteen Hall of Fame, the KHSAA Hall of Fame, and the Eminence Independent Schools Hall of Fame. After leaving Brewers, he coached three years at Memphis State, was coach and principal at Sedalia High School for five years, and was superintendent at Eminence Independent Schools for fourteen years.


~ Contributors ~
Reed Conder

Reed Conder

Superintendent of Marshall County Schools for 24 years, principal at South Marshall High for 11 years, principal and coach at Brewers for 4 years. Led Marshall County through consolidation in the 1970s and has been an icon in Marshall County history for the past 40 years. Instrumental in building the Marshall County High School gymnasium, rated as one of the top ten high school venues in the country by USA Today, the gym is named in his honor.


Ray Mofield

Ray Mofield

Dr. Ray Mofield Renowned radio broadcaster who taught communications at Murray State University and broadcast basketball games for several years in Marshall County and throughout western Kentucky, Mofield made famous the quote “rip the netting” after a made basket. He served for several years as assistant to Murray State University President Ralph Woods, and was also chairman of the Murray State University Communications Department. He also worked several years for CBS.


Carroll Traylor

Carroll Traylor


Dr. Carroll Traylor One of the main supporters in bringing football to Marshall County, Traylor saw his dream come true in 1967 when North Marshall offered football for the first time. Traylor served as team doctor and continued in that capacity for several years at Marshall County High School. Traylor also served for several years as a member of the Marshall County Board of Education. Today the football stadium at Marshall County High School is named in his honor.